View Full Version : [Space] NASA - STS-123 - ISS-1J/A (Endeavour)


GioFX
01-03-2008, 13:54
NASA STS-123 - ISS Assembly Mission 1J/A

http://collectspace.com/review/sts123_patch01.jpg

Benvenuti nella discussione ufficiale dell'STS-123, missione di costruzione ISS 1J/A.

La missione ha come obbiettivo primario l'installazione del Modulo Laboratorio Logistico Giapponese (Kibo/ELM) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Experiment_Module) e del Sistema Robotico Canadese SPDM (Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Purpose_Dexterous_Manipulator). 25ima missione Shuttle diretta all'ISS.


Dati Missione

Lancio previsto: NET 11 marzo 2008 - 2:28 AM EDT (07:28 ora italiana)

Missione Programma STS: STS-123 (122° volo Shuttle, 21° volo OV-105)

Missione Programma ISS: 1J/A

Orbiter: Endeavour (OV-105)

Launch Pad: 39A

Durata: 16 giorni (SSPT)

Sito atterraggio previsto: KSC, 26 marzo 2008 ore 08:35PM EST (02:35 ora italiana)

Inclinazione/Altitudine: 51.6°/122 miglia nautiche

Payload principale:

Japanese Experiment Logistics Module "Kibo" (ELM)
Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM)


Equipaggio

Commander Dominic Gorie
Pilot Gregory H. Johnson
Mission specialist 1 Bob Behnken
Mission specialist 2 Michael J. Foreman
Mission specialist 3 Richard M. Linnehan
Mission specialist 4 Takao Doi

Launching ISS Expedition 16 Crew Member: Garrett E. Reisman
Landing ISS Expedition 16 Crew Member: Léopold Eyharts


http://spaceflight1.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-123/lores/sts123-s-002.jpg


Assembly Mission 1J/A

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160519main_jsc2006e43505_low.jpg (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160540main_jsc2006e43505_high.jpg)
(Cliccare sulla foto per vederla in alta risoluzione)



Altre informazioni

Mission Quicklook (SpaceFlightNow.com)

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/fdf/images/123quicklook1.gif

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/fdf/images/123quicklook2.gif


Master Flight Plan (SpaceFlightNow.com

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/fdf/123flightplan.html


STS-123 Fact Sheet

[non ancora disponibile]


STS-123 Press Kit

[non ancora disponibile]


STS-123 Execute Packages

[non ancora disponibile]


Previsioni Meteo - Lancio (KSC)

http://www.patrick.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-070517-025.pdf


NASA TV

Programma

PDF: http://www.nasa.gov/tvschedule/pdf/tvsked_rev0.pdf

URL: http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Schedule.html


NASA TV - Real Media: http://www.nasa.gov/ram/35037main_portal.ram

NASA TV - Windows Media: http://www.nasa.gov/55644main_NASATV_Windows.asx

NASA TV - Real Audio: http://www.nasa.gov/ram/55643main_NASATV_Audio_Only.ram

GioFX
01-03-2008, 15:24
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Shuttle Endeavour cleared for its March 11 launch

BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: February 29, 2008

NASA managers completed a two-day flight readiness review today and formally cleared the shuttle Endeavour for blastoff March 11 on a 16-day space station assembly mission featuring five spacewalks, delivery of a new Japanese module and assembly of a complex Canadian hand-like attachment for the station's robot arm.

Endeavour's seven-member crew - commander Dominic Gorie, pilot Gregory Johnson, flight engineer Michael Foreman, Richard Linnehan, Robert Behnken, Japanese astronaut Takao Doi and space station flight engineer Garrett Reisman - plans to fly to the Kennedy Space Center next Friday night for the 3 a.m. Saturday (March 8) start of the countdown to launch.

Liftoff is targeted for 2:28:10 a.m. on March 11, roughly the moment Earth's rotation carries launch complex 39A into the plane of the space station's orbit.

"We had a very thorough review over the last day and a half," said Bill Gerstenmaier, manager of space operations at NASA headquarters. "The teams are ready to go launch here on March 11. We're really not working very many open items, and that's a tribute to the team and the great performance of Atlantis (on the recently concluded STS-122 mission).

"There wasn't a lot of work that we're carrying forward out of this review into the next review at L-minus 2 (days) and that's a tribute to the team and it's also evidence that we're really ready to go fly and we're not rushing things."

Gerstenmaier said analysis of debris from a disabled spy satellite that was blown apart by a Navy missile last week in a dramatic shoot down showed no significant additional risk for Endeavour's crew.

"We took a look at that, we had our analysts take a look at the latest predictions of what debris is remaining from that event, we've calculated it and it really poses no risk to the shuttle with where we are. There's just a small change in risk over the mission, I think we went from 1-in-269 to 1-in-259, which is just a minor, trivial change. We probably don't know the debris model that well to see that kind of difference. So we looked at it, we reviewed it, we'll continue to talk to folks to make sure there's nothing, but we don't see any concerns."

The numbers, he said, refer to the odds of a "critical penetration" of the shuttle by space debris over the course of the 16-day mission.

NASA will have two days to get Endeavour off the ground before standing down to make way for the launch of an Air Force Delta 2 rocket carrying a new Global Positioning System navigation satellite. Launch is scheduled for March 15 at 2:09 a.m.

"In order to turn around the range from our launch attempts to theirs requires 48 hours," said shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach. "So we have two launch attempts for the shuttle program, the 11th and 12th. If we don't launch by the 12th we have to stand down for the Delta program. And that's about a five-day stand down when you add all the factors together. Our next launch attempt would be the 17th."

Assuming an on-time launch, Endeavour will dock with the space station around 11:27 p.m. on March 12. The Japanese logistics module will be installed the next day during the first of five planned spacewalks. Linnehan and Reisman will carry out the first excursion, Linnehan will be joined by Foreman for the second on March 15 and by Behnken for the third on March 17. All three will be devoted primarily to assembling the new Canadian special purpose dexterous manipulator, or DEXTRE, a mechanical hand of sorts that can be attached to the station's robot arm.

Benkhen and Foreman will carry out the final two spacewalks on March 20 and 22 to test a heat shield repair tool and to help mount the shuttle's heat shield inspection boom on the station. The 50-foot-long boom will be left behind when Endeavour departs because of interference issues when a second, much larger Japanese module is launched on the next assembly mission in late May.

If all goes well, Endeavour will undock from the space station around 8 p.m. on March 24 and land back at the Kennedy Space Center around 8:35 p.m. on March 26.

Endeavour's flight is the longest yet for a shuttle visiting the international space station. The long duration is possible because of a new station-to-shuttle power transfer system that will let Endeavour tap into the lab's solar power grid.

New shuttle Program Manager John Shannon said there are no plans at present to extend Endeavour's mission beyond 16 days, although that option is available if problems develop or if the crew needs additional time to accomplish major mission objectives.

"Right now, we have 16 days, we have one extension day that we could add to the flight," Shannon said. "Right now, the entire mission fits inside those 16 days. But it is very complicated, it's a very complex mission, we're doing a lot of different things. So I wouldn't say absolutely we won't extend or not. We have that option available to us."

Adding to the complexity of the operation, the European Space Agency is scheduled to launch the "Jules Verne," its new Automated Transfer Vehicle, or ATV, next Friday night from Kourou, French Guiana. The ATV, a large, unmanned cargo carrier designed to ferry critical supplies and equipment to the space station, is scheduled to dock at the aft port of the station's Russian Zvezda module at 10:20 a.m. on April 3. It will be "parked" in orbit some some 1,200 miles from the station during Endeavour's mission.

Because the shuttle, station and ATV all rely on NASA communications satellites, "there will be some times during the mission where we may not have comm with the orbiter like we normally do," Gerstenmaier said. "We'll have comm periodically during an orbit, not all the time. So we discussed that (today). if we really need comm with all three vehicles - ATV, shuttle and station - we can do that, we can set it up. But from a scheduling standpoint, we'd like to minimize those periods where we need high-rate communications with all three vehicles."


Articolo:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080229frr/

Codename47
01-03-2008, 16:31
Ovviamente iscritto, forse non potrò seguire il lancio in diretta (sarò a scuola e non credo di avere tempo), però tutto il resto della missione non me lo perdo, sperando che i momenti più importanti siano al pomeriggio :D

Hitman079
01-03-2008, 18:10
ecchime

Ukronia
02-03-2008, 09:06
presente :)

Marilson
02-03-2008, 10:33
iscritto

Octane
06-03-2008, 12:48
eccomi!
(un doveroso grazie a GioFX per il thread dedicato ad elevato contenuto informativo... mai pensato di farlo per professione? ;) )

Super Vegetto
06-03-2008, 14:02
Eccomi anch' io, e il solito grazie a GioFX: penso che alla NASA aspettino il suo topic d' apertura, altrimenti rimandano il lancio:vicini:

Dj Ruck
06-03-2008, 14:40
presente...non voglio perdermi né lancio, né permanenza, né rientro :D:D

Octane
06-03-2008, 15:00
una domanda: il problema di congestionamento dei sistemi (o dei canali) di comunicazione riguarda solamente le "hig rate communications" o anche la semplice telemetria (status, posizione, velocita', ecc..)?
non possono adottare un sistema di time-multiplexing?

Tommy81
06-03-2008, 17:37
se ce la farò ci sarò anch'io ;)

GioFX
06-03-2008, 20:06
una domanda: il problema di congestionamento dei sistemi (o dei canali) di comunicazione riguarda solamente le "hig rate communications" o anche la semplice telemetria (status, posizione, velocita', ecc..)?
non possono adottare un sistema di time-multiplexing?

Credo che riguardino tutte le comunicazioni sui canali UHF e Ku tramite la rete TDRS, quindi comunicazion audio e video.

I limiti sono dovuti alla rete TDRS in queste frequenze, però non conosco ancora nei dettagli l'architettura.

GioFX
06-03-2008, 20:33
Da NasaSpaceFlight.com:

Endeavour's UHF radio fails re-test - Pressurization latest

By Chris Bergin, 3/6/2008 7:06:22 AM

Endeavour's problematic UHF radio - which underwent replacement via parts donated from Atlantis at the weekend - has failed a re-test. The Engineering Review Board (ERB) has recommended to fly as-is, though this needs to be approved by the upcoming noon board meeting.

The shuttle is also undergoing Hyper/MPS (Main Propulsion System) pressurization - which will require an element of troubleshooting via the replacement of a solenoid valve at the pad today. Final pressurization activities are still expected to be completed by Friday.


http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=5372

GioFX
08-03-2008, 15:22
SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 2008
0808 GMT (3:08 a.m. EST)

Inside Firing Room 4, countdown clocks have started ticking toward Tuesday's planned liftoff of the space shuttle Endeavour.

Launch team members gathered for the "call to stations" at 2:30 a.m. EST, and then the three-day countdown commenced at 3 a.m. as scheduled.

Clocks read T-minus 43 hours and counting. But a series of holds are timed throughout the next few days, leading to Thursday's targeted liftoff time of 2:28 a.m. EDT.

The early portion of the count involves buttoning up launch pad equipment and removing platforms inside the shuttle's crew module, reviewing flight software stored in Endeavour's mass memory units, loading backup software into the general purpose computers and testing navigation systems.

Xile
08-03-2008, 15:29
Nel caso del bisogno si potrebbe ampliare la ISS anche dopo averla terminata di costruire?

GioFX
08-03-2008, 15:51
Nel caso del bisogno si potrebbe ampliare la ISS anche dopo averla terminata di costruire?

Per le discussioni sull'ISS rimando al thread relativo: http://www.hwupgrade.it/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=612541.

Cmq chiaramente tutto è possibile, ma assai improbabile. Se non per i costi e il lifetime previsto di operatività della stazione, anche solo per il fatto che gli accordi internazionali del programma ISS non lo prevedono.

error 404
09-03-2008, 22:34
Ma questa è sfiga!!!
Ero sicuro di riuscire a vedermelo almeno questo lancio... alle 8 e mezzo parte :cry:

GioFX
10-03-2008, 21:37
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Comm cable swapped out as countdown rolls on

BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: March 10, 2008

Rollback of a protective gantry from the shuttle Endeavour was delayed today while engineers replaced a suspect cockpit audio cable that will be used by flight engineer Mike Foreman during the climb to space early Tuesday. Tower rollback was delayed about three hours, but by 9 a.m., the huge gantry was in its launch position and engineers said the snag would not have any impact on the remainder of Endeavour's countdown.

Launch is targeted for 2:28:14 a.m. and forecasts are continuing to predict a 90 percent chance of acceptable weather. Other than the cable replacement and work overnight to repair minor tile damage near a nose rocket thruster, the countdown is proceeding smoothly with no technical issues of any significance.

NASA's Mission Management Team plans to meet late this afternoon to assess the weather and any outstanding technical issues before giving the launch team permission to begin loading a half-million gallons of liquid oxygen and hydrogen rocket fuel into Endeavour's external tank. The three-hour remotely controlled procedure is scheduled to begin around 5 p.m.

Endeavour's crew - Foreman, commander Dominic Gorie, pilot Gregory Johnson, Richard Linnehan, Robert Behnken, Japanese astronaut Takao Doi and space station flight engineer Garrett Reisman - plans to don their pressure suits and head for the pad to strap in around 10:38 p.m.

Endeavour's trajectory for the second night launch of the post-Columbia era will carry it along a path paralleling the East Coast of the United States, a dramatic sight for viewers with clear weather. T.S. Kelso, a noted satellite tracking analyst, provides a very useful visualization tool illustrating the shuttle's flight path and visibility from various locations. Interested readers can find the STS-123 data file, and the free Analytical Graphics viewer software necessary to play it, here:

AGI Viewer (http://www.agi.com/products/viewer/)

STS-123 data file (http://celestrak.com/events/sts-123-launch.asp)

Here is a timeline for the remainder of today's countdown, major ascent events and the crew's post-launch timeline (in EDT; best viewed with fixed-width font):

EDT...........EVENT

03:03 PM......Begin 2-hour built-in hold (T-minus 6 hours)
03:58 PM......Crew wakeup
04:03 PM......External tank ready for loading
04:18 PM......Mission management team tanking meeting
05:03 PM......Resume countdown (T-minus 6 hours)

05:03 PM......Liquid oxygen (LO2), liquid hydrogen (LH2) transfer line chilldown
05:13 PM......Main propulsion system chill down
05:13 PM......LH2 slow fill
05:43 PM......LO2 slow fill
05:48 PM......Hydrogen ECO sensors go wet
05:53 PM......LO2 fast fill
06:03 PM......LH2 fast fill
07:58 PM......LH2 topping
08:03 PM......LH2 replenish
08:03 PM......LO2 replenish

08:03 PM......Begin 2-hour 30-minute built-in hold (T-minus 3 hours)
08:03 PM......Closeout crew to white room
08:03 PM......External tank in stable replenish mode
08:18 PM......Astronaut support personnel comm checks
08:48 PM......Pre-ingress switch reconfig
08:55 PM......Crew breakfast/photo op (recorded)
09:30 PM......NASA television launch coverage begins
09:58 PM......Final crew weather briefing
10:08 PM......Crew suit up begins
10:33 PM......Resume countdown (T-minus 3 hours)

10:38 PM......Crew departs O&C building
11:08 PM......Crew ingress
11:58 PM......Astronaut comm checks

Tue 03/11/08

12:13 AM......Hatch closure
12:53 AM......White room closeout

01:13 AM......Begin 10-minute built-in hold (T-minus 20m)
01:23 AM......NASA test director countdown briefing
01:23 AM......Resume countdown (T-minus 20m)

01:24 AM......Backup flight computer to OPS 1
01:28 AM......KSC area clear to launch

01:34 AM......Begin final built-in hold (T-minus 9m)
02:04 AM......NTD launch status verification
02:19:14 AM...Resume countdown (T-minus 9m)

02:20:44 AM...Orbiter access arm retraction
02:23:14 AM...Launch window opens
02:23:14 AM...Hydraulic power system (APU) start
02:23:19 AM...Terminate LO2 replenish
02:24:14 AM...Purge sequence 4 hydraulic test
02:24:14 AM...Inertial measurement units to inertial
02:24:19 AM...Elevons, speed brake steering check
02:24:44 AM...Main engine steering test
02:25:19 AM...LO2 tank pressurization
02:25:39 AM...Fuel cells to internal reactants
02:25:44 AM...Clear caution-and-warning memory
02:26:14 AM...Crew closes visors
02:26:17 AM...LH2 tank pressurization
02:27:24 AM...Booster joint heater deactivation
02:27:43 AM...Shuttle flight computers take control of countdown
02:27:53 AM...Booster steering test
02:28:07 AM...Main engine start (T-6.6 seconds)

02:28:14 AM...LAUNCH

..............Return to Launch Site abort option available (1 engine out)

02:28:24 AM...(T+00:10) Start roll maneuver
02:28:32 AM...(T+00:18) Start throttle down (72%)
02:29:03 AM...(T+00:49) Max q (686 pounds per square foot)
02:29:07 AM...(T+00:53) Start throttle up (104.5%)
02:30:19 AM...(T+02:05) Booster separation
02:30:29 AM...(T+02:15) Start OMS assist rocket firing (1:54 duration)

..............Trans-Atlantic Landing abort option available (1 engine out)

02:30:47 AM...(T+02:33) 2 Engine TAL Moron (104.5%, 2S)
02:30:52 AM...(T+02:38) 2 Engine TAL Zaragoza (104.5%, 2S)
02:31:03 AM...(T+02:49) 2 Engine TAL Istres (104.5%, 2S)
02:32:01 AM...(T+03:47) Negative return (KSC) (104.5%, 3S)

..............Abort to Orbit option available (1 engine out)

02:33:16 AM...(T+05:02) Press to ATO (104.5%, 2S, 160 u/s)
02:33:38 AM...(T+05:24) Droop Zaragoza (109%,0s)
02:33:40 AM...(T+05:26) Single engine ops-3 Zaragoza (109%,0s,2eo simo)
02:34:01 AM...(T+05:47) Roll to headsup

..............Normal orbit available (1 engine out)

02:34:17 AM...(T+06:03) Press to MECO (104.5%, 2S, 160 u/s)
02:34:18 AM...(T+06:04) Single engine TAL Zaragoza (104.5%,2S,2eo simo)
02:34:18 AM...(T+06:04) Single engine TAL Moron(109%,0s,2eo seq,1st eo @ 5780 vi)
02:34:18 AM...(T+06:04) Single engine TAL Istres(109%,0s,2eo seq,1st eo @ 6150 vi)
02:35:09 AM...(T+06:55) Single engine press-to-MECO (104.5%, 2S, 566 u/s)
02:35:34 AM...(T+07:20) Negative Moron (2@67%)
02:35:36 AM...(T+07:22) 3G limiting
02:35:55 AM...(T+07:41) Last 2 eng pre-MECO TAL Zaragoza (67%)
02:35:55 AM...(T+07:41) Negative Istres (2@67%)
02:36:02 AM...(T+07:48) Last single eng pre-MECO TAL Zaragoza (104.5%)
02:36:07 AM...(T+07:53) 23K
02:36:07 AM...(T+07:53) Last 3 eng pre-meco TAL Zaragoza (67%)
02:36:32 AM...(T+08:18) Last TAL Diego Garcia
02:36:37 AM...(T+08:23) Engine cutoff command (MECO)
02:36:43 AM...(T+08:29) Zero thrust

03:06:00 AM...OMS-2 rocket firing to raise perigee
03:18:00 AM...Post insertion timeline begins
04:58:00 AM...Laptop computer setup (part 1)
05:08:00 AM...Robot arm powerup
05:50:00 AM...NC-1 rendezvous rocket firing
06:03:00 AM...Robot arm checkout
06:18:00 AM...External tank umbilical camera downlink
07:08:00 AM...Group B computer powerdown
08:28:00 AM...Crew sleep begins



---
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080310count/

Dj Ruck
10-03-2008, 21:50
bene...allora domani alle 8.28 in Italia si parte????:D :D

albertoz85
10-03-2008, 21:54
Ma questa è sfiga!!!
Ero sicuro di riuscire a vedermelo almeno questo lancio... alle 8 e mezzo parte :cry:

bene...allora domani alle 8.28 in Italia si parte????

Guardate che parte alle 7:28... non è bello toppare un lancio per aver sbagliato il calcolo del fuso... :rolleyes:

Codename47
10-03-2008, 22:18
Guardate che parte alle 7:28... non è bello toppare un lancio per aver sbagliato il calcolo del fuso... :rolleyes:

Giusto :mc: Proprio oggi è entrata l'ora legale negli states! Allora riesco a vedere il lancioooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!! :read:

Dj Ruck
10-03-2008, 22:30
Guardate che parte alle 7:28... non è bello toppare un lancio per aver sbagliato il calcolo del fuso... :rolleyes:

ah...bene...allora ho fatto bene a ricordarlo :asd: :asd:
così avete corretto eheh!!!

GioFX
10-03-2008, 23:34
Guardate che parte alle 7:28... non è bello toppare un lancio per aver sbagliato il calcolo del fuso... :rolleyes:

Chiedo scusa se, quando ho scritto il primo posto con i dati della missione lo scorso sabato, ho dimenticato che negli USA (dal 2007) il passaggio da EST ad EDT avviene la prima settimana di marzo, e non più la prima di aprile.

Menomale che c'è gente più "sveglia".

GioFX
10-03-2008, 23:41
Quindi, come correttamente e gentilmente ha fatto notare albertoz85, il lancio è previsto per le:

07:28 ora italiana

del

11 marzo 2008

GioFX
10-03-2008, 23:43
2114 GMT (5:14 p.m. EDT)

FUELING UNDERWAY. The filling of space shuttle Endeavour's external fuel tank with a half-million gallons of supercold propellants has begun at launch pad 39A.

The tanking operation commenced with the chilldown thermal conditioning process at 5:04 p.m.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 01:36
0010 GMT (8:10 p.m. EDT Mon.)

FUELING COMPLETED. The external fuel tank has been pumped full with a half-million gallons of supercold liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The three-hour fueling process started at 5:04 p.m. with the chilldown conditioning.

But given the cryogenic nature of the oxidizer and propellant, the supplies naturally boil away. So the tanks are continuously topped off until the final minutes of the countdown in a procedure called "stable replenishment."

With the hazardous tanking operation completed, the Orbiter Closeout Crew and Final Inspection Team have been given the OK to go out to the pad to perform their jobs. The closeout crew will ready Endeavour's crew module for the astronauts' ingress in a couple of hours; and the inspection team will give the entire vehicle a check for any ice formation following fueling.

danny2005
11-03-2008, 07:02
ok primo lancio notturno che seguo :cool: :D

gente....svegliaaaaaaaaa!!!!

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:19
Grazie ad un mega rootkit mi son potuto collegare solo ora, che bello!


0615 GMT (2:15 a.m. EDT)

NASA launch director Mike Leinbach has conducted his poll and given approval to resume the countdown for liftoff at 2:28 a.m. this morning!

"It should be interesting for you to punch through the clouds tonight," Leinbach radioed commander Dom Gorie.

"You've just made a lot of people smile around the world, and you've got seven smiling faces here on Endeavour," Gorie said.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:20
0619:14 GMT (2:19:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 9 minutes and counting! The Ground Launch Sequencer has been initiated. The computer program is located in a console in the Firing Room of the Complex 39 Launch Control Center. The GLS is the master of events through liftoff. During the last 9 minutes of the countdown, the computer will monitor as many as a thousand different systems and measurements to ensure that they do not fall out of any pre-determine red-line limits. At T-minus 31 seconds, the GLS will hand off to the onboard computers of Endeavour to complete their own automatic sequence of events through the final half minute of the countdown.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:23
0622:44 GMT (2:22:44 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 5 minutes, 30 seconds. APU pre-start is complete and the units are ready for activation. The orbiters flight data recorders have gone into the record mode to collect measurements of shuttle systems performance during flight.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:24
0623:14 GMT (2:23:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 5 minutes. The "go" has been given for for Auxiliary Power Unit start. Pilot Greg Johnson is now flipping three switches in Endeavour's cockpit to start each of the three APU's. The units, located in the aft compartment of Endeavour, provide the pressure needed to power the hydraulic systems of the shuttle. The units will be used during the launch and landing phases of the mission for such events as moving the orbiter's aerosurfaces, gimbaling the main engine nozzles and deploying the landing gear.

Over the course of the next minute, the orbiter's heaters will be configured for launch by commander Dom Gorie, the fuel valve heaters on the main engines will be turned off in preparation for engine ignition at T-6.6 seconds and the external tank and solid rocket booster safe and arm devices will be armed.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:24
0624:14 GMT (2:24:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 4 minutes. Activation of the APUs is complete. The three units are up and running normally.

And the final helium purge sequence is underway in the main propulsion system. This procedure readies fuel system valves for engine start. In the next few seconds, the aerosurfaces of Endeavour will be run through a pre-planned mobility test to ensure readiness for launch. This is also a dress rehearsal for flight of the orbiter's hydraulic systems.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:25
0625:14 GMT (2:25:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 3 minutes. Orbiter steering check is now complete; the main engine nozzles are in their start positions.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:26
0626:14 GMT (2:20:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 2 minutes. The astronauts are being instructed to close and lock the visors on their launch and entry helmets.

At T-minus 1 minute, 57 seconds the replenishment to the flight load of liquid hydrogen in the external tank will be terminated and tank pressurization will begin.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:27
0626:44 GMT (2:26:44 a.m. EDT)

Now 90 seconds from launch. All remains "go" for liftoff of Endeavour and the seven-man crew at 2:45 p.m.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:27
0627:14 GMT (2:27:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 1 minute. Computers are verifying that the main engines are ready for ignition. Sound suppression water system is armed. The system will activate at T-minus 16 seconds to suppress the sound produced at launch. And the residual hydrogen burn ignitors are armed. They will be fired at T-minus 10 seconds to burn off hydrogen gas from beneath the main engine nozzles.

Shortly, the external tank strut heaters will be turned off; Endeavour will transition to internal power; the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen outboard fill and drain valves will be closed; the payload bay vent doors will be positioned for the launch; and the gaseous oxygen vent arm will be verified fully retracted.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:28
0627:43 GMT (2:27:43 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 31 seconds. AUTO SEQUENCE START! The handoff has occurred from the Ground Launch Sequencer to the space shuttle. Endeavour's computers now controlling.

In the next few seconds, the solid rocket booster hydraulic steering system will be started, the orbiter's body flap and speed brake moved to their launch positions, the firing chain armed. Main engine ignition begins at T-minus 6.6 seconds.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:29
0628:14 GMT (2:28:14 a.m. EDT)

T-minus 10 seconds, go for main engine start, fuel valves are opening, engine ignition, 3, 2, 1 and LIFTOFF! Liftoff of Endeavour on the 25th space shuttle construction flight to the International Space Station!

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:30
0629 GMT (2:29 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 60 seconds. All systems are looking good one minute into the flight as the space shuttle creates an extraordinary nighttime display of power and light. Endeavour is traveling on a northeastward trajectory toward orbit, its speed already in excess of 1,000 miles per hour as the main engines and twin solid rockets generate nearly 7 million pounds of thrust.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:31
0630 GMT (2:30 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 2 minutes, 10 seconds. Mission Control confirms a good jettison of the solid rocket boosters has occurred. The spent boosters will parachute into the Atlantic Ocean for retrieval. Endeavour continues its nighttime streak toward space on the power generated by the three liquid-fueled main engines.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:34
0633 GMT (2:33 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 5 minutes, 6 seconds. "Press to ATO". Endeavour can reach an orbit, albeit a low orbit, on two engines should one shut down now. But all three powerplants are still running just fine.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:37
0636 GMT (2:36 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 8 minutes, 34 seconds. MECO. Main Engine Cutoff confirmed! Endeavour has reached orbit carrying the first module for Japan's Kibo science laboratory facilities and Canada's Dextre robot arm device.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:38
0637 GMT (2:37 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 8 minutes, 47 seconds. The emptied external tank has been jettisoned from the belly of space shuttle Endeavour. The tank will fall back into the atmosphere where it will burn up harmlessly.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:41
0638 GMT (2:38 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 10 minutes. An issue with reaction control system thrusters and the shuttle's flash evaporator cooling system switching from primary to backup were radioed to the crew during ascent. Standing by for additional details.

Codename47
11-03-2008, 07:53
Presente, molto suggestivo il lancio in notturna :) Continuerò a seguire l'evolversi della situazione da scuola :D

GioFX
11-03-2008, 07:54
Replay del lancio ora su NASA TV:

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html

GioFX
11-03-2008, 08:11
0708 GMT (3:08 a.m. EDT)

T+plus 40 minutes. The twin Orbital Maneuvering System engines on the tail of Endeavour have been fired successfully to propel the shuttle the rest of the way to orbit. The burn occurred over the Indian Ocean.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 08:13
Fase del lancio terminata! Endeavour è entrato ufficialmente nel fase di Post-Insertion.

http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images/medium/08pd0696-m.jpg

Quincy_it
11-03-2008, 08:31
Presente (anche se mi sono perso il lancio in diretta). :cry:

Octane
11-03-2008, 09:27
http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images/medium/08pd0696-m.jpg
che immagine! :eek:

Dj Ruck
11-03-2008, 10:02
:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Mi sono svegliato ma non mi sono voluto alzare...troppo sonno :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

a quando il prossimo???
a quando passeggiate??? immagini dallo spazio????
a quando il rientro...info info info...non lasciatemi nell'oblio uiaheuiahe:cry: :cry:

Octane
11-03-2008, 10:35
:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Mi sono svegliato ma non mi sono voluto alzare...troppo sonno :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

a quando il prossimo???
a quando passeggiate??? immagini dallo spazio????
a quando il rientro...info info info...non lasciatemi nell'oblio uiaheuiahe:cry: :cry:
tranquillo, trovi tutto in prima pagina! ;)

..e per gli ultimi aggiornamenti puoi sempre guardare qui:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/status.html

Dj Ruck
11-03-2008, 10:48
tranquillo, trovi tutto in prima pagina! ;)

..e per gli ultimi aggiornamenti puoi sempre guardare qui:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/status.html

uhm...effettivamente non mi ci son omai soffermato tanto eheh:ciapet: :ciapet:

cmq...il rientro è il 26 marzo alle 02:35 in italia:O :O

ma...vedremo ehehe...però la psossima volta non voglio perdermi la partenza...e or ami segno anche le passeggiate :D

Dj Ruck
11-03-2008, 11:13
WOW...c'è una cosa che si è alzata ora:eek: :eek: :eek:
Dalla carlinga dello Shuttle!!!

Dj Ruck
11-03-2008, 11:17
porca zozzola...in lontananza c'era una sfera di luce che si muoveva :eek: :eek:
Satellite??? asteroide???

error 404
11-03-2008, 13:09
Fantastico, lo potevo vedere e invece l'ho perso per 3600 secondi di troppo.

Dj Ruck
11-03-2008, 13:11
ragazzi vi faccio vedere alcune cose che ho appena fatto...son oun pò pesanti ma spero vi piacciano lo stesso eheh...

Immagini della ISS: passaggio dalla costa Africana SO all'Oceano Pacifico
http://www.webalice.it/roccorago/Foto%20forum%20HU/Pictures%20from%20ISS%20From%20Africa%20SW%20coast%20to%20pacific%20Ocean.gif

Braccio dello Shuttle
http://www.webalice.it/roccorago/Foto%20forum%20HU/Shuttle.gif

Lancio Shuttle

http://www.webalice.it/roccorago/Foto%20forum%20HU/Lancio%20Shuttle.gif

mentre scattavo, c'era delle piccole meteoriti che cadevano ed era bellissimo vederle...solo che non sono riuscito a fotografarle:cry: :cry:

baban
11-03-2008, 15:25
ragazzi scusate se dico una boiata ma io sapevo che i decolli notturni fossero stati vietati dopo l'incidente del columbia...non è così?

chiedo scusa se ho detto una stupidaggine:D

Codename47
11-03-2008, 15:37
ragazzi scusate se dico una boiata ma io sapevo che i decolli notturni fossero stati vietati dopo l'incidente del columbia...non è così?

chiedo scusa se ho detto una stupidaggine:D

In effetti anch'io avevo sentito così... :confused: A quanto pare non è vero :p

Octane
11-03-2008, 16:17
In effetti anch'io avevo sentito così... :confused: A quanto pare non è vero :p
in base al rapporto del CAIB (Columbia Accident Investigation Board) non si sono piu' fatti lanci notturni o che durante la traiettoria di ascesa si venissero a trovare nell'emisfero non illuminato. Questo per garantire una sufficiente illuminazione alle riprese della parte ventrale dell'orbiter durante la salita in orbita.
Ora che sono stati apportati tutti i miglioramenti previsti dal RTF plan (return to flight) all'ET, SRB, e Orbiter e che la qualita' delle riprese e' migliorata anche in condizioni di scarsa illuminazione la direzione del programma Shuttle ha deciso di rimuovere questa limitazione.
In questo modo potranno rispettare le scadenze per l'assemblaggio dell'ISS prima della messa a terra definitiva degli orbiter.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 20:55
In realtà, se non ricordo male, il CAIB non parlava espressamente di evitare i lanci notturni, ma la sospensione è stata un'iniziativa della NASA, per poter prima sperimentare con successo in condizioni ottimali di illuminazione (ed avere quindi una sufficiente sicurezza) che le modifiche apportate per limitare al minimo distacchi di materiale dall'ET durante il lancio fossero efficaci.

GioFX
11-03-2008, 20:58
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Shuttle Endeavour roars into the night

BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: March 11, 2008;
Updated with cooling system details, debris report

The space shuttle Endeavour, carrying a crew of seven, a Japanese space station module and a high-tech Canadian robot with 11-foot-long arms, vaulted into orbit early today, lighting up the pre-dawn sky for miles around as it knifed through low clouds and rocketed away on a 16-day space station assembly mission.

"OK, Dom, the vehicle's in great shape, the weather is go, in fact it should be an interesting sight for you to punch through the clouds tonight," Launch Director Mike Leinbach radioed during a final hold in the countdown. "So on behalf of the KSC launch team, I'd like to wish you good luck, Godspeed and we'll see you back here in 16 days."

"Well Mike, you've just made people smile around the world and you've got seven smiling faces on board here," commander Dom Gorie replied from the shuttle's cockpit. "We'd like to give a special thanks to our families, KSC's Endeavour crew, our friends in Houston and Canada and for JAXA (the Japanese space agency), we'd like to say konichwa, doomo arigatoo and banzai! God has truly blessed us with a beautiful night ... to launch, so let's light 'em up and give 'em a show."

With its three hydrogen-fueled main engines roaring at full throttle, Endeavour's twin solid-fuel boosters ignited with a rush of fiery exhaust at 2:28:14 a.m., instantly pushing the spacecraft away from pad 39A atop twin pillars of 5,000-degree flame.

Climbing straight up for the first 10 seconds, Endeavour wheeled about to put the crew in a heads-down orientation beneath the external tank and arced away to the northeast on a course paralleling the East Coast. It was only the second night launch since the 2003 Columbia disaster and Endeavour put on a spectacular, if brief, sky show as it passed through a deck of clouds about 6,300 feet above the launch pad and disappeared from view.

Monitoring the computer-controlled ascent from Endeavour's upper flight deck were Gorie, pilot Gregory Johnson, flight engineer Michael Foreman and Robert Behnken. Strapped in on the shuttle's lower deck were Richard Linnehan, Japanese astronaut Takao Doi and space station flight engineer Garrett Reisman, hitching a ride to the lab complex to replace outgoing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts.

Telemetry from the shuttle indicated a problem moments after liftoff with a loss of data from two of the ship's reaction control system maneuvering jets and a few minutes later, a glitch of some sort forced a switch to an alternate cooling system controller. The flash evaporator system, or FES, is primarily used during ascent and entry, when the shuttle's cargo bay doors are closed and Freon coolant loop radiators are not yet deployed.

LeRoy Cain, chairing NASA's Mission Management Team, described the problems as "minor" and said neither was expected to have any impact on Endeavour's mission.

"It's a fully redundant system," he said. "It's the kind of thing we have seen fail in this way during powered flight a number of times. ... I fully expect we'll be able to resolve it. It's a loss of redundancy in the very worst case."

As with all space station flights, today's launching was timed to roughly coincide with the moment Earth's rotation carried the launch pad into the plane of the lab's orbit. As a result, takeoff occurred in darkness and even with a camera mounted on the side of the shuttle's external tank, there was little to see after Endeavour's solid-fuel boosters separated two minutes and five seconds into flight.

Eight-and-a-half minutes after liftoff, the shuttle's main engines shut down and seconds later, the spaceplane separated from its external tank. As Endeavour pulled away, live television views from the tank camera showed periodic flashes as a digital camera in the belly of the shuttle used a new Nikon flash system to illuminate the tank. The goal was to collect detailed digital pictures to help engineers assess the condition of the tank's foam insulation even in orbital darkness.

A quick look at the limited video available from ground cameras indicated at least one piece of debris separated and fell away 83 seconds after liftoft. The incident occurred while the shuttle was still in the thicker, lower atmosphere, which can produce higher impact velocities, But astronaut James Dutton in mission control told the crew the debris, whatever it might have been, did not appear to strike the orbiter.

"We did track one piece of debris that appeared to move past the right wing at 83 seconds," Dutton said. "There was no impact seen. ... Overall, it looked really nice."

The astronauts will carry out their own heat shield inspection later this evening, using a sensor boom on the end of the shuttle's robot arm to check the condition of the ship's nose cap and wing leading edge panels, which experience the most extreme heating during re-entry. if all goes well, Gorie will guide the shuttle to a docking with the space station around 11:30 p.m. Wednesday.

The primary goals of the 122nd shuttle mission are to install a Japanese equipment module atop the forward Harmony module; to assemble Canada's special purpose dextrous manipulator robot, known informally as "Dextre;" to deliver spare parts and supplies; and to test a new heat shield repair technique, one of the final steps in NASA's recovery from the Columbia disaster.

Five spacewalks are planned - the most of any station assembly flight to date - over 12 docked days. That's the longest shuttle stay at the station since construction began in 1998. Endeavour is equipped with a new station-to-shuttle power transfer system that lets it tap into the lab's solar power grid, permitting longer stays than possible with the shuttle's fuel cells alone.

The Japanese module mounted in Endeavour's cargo bay is the first of two that will make up an entire wing of the space station, a state-of-the-art addition that will complement U.S. and European research modules. But the assembly of Canada's $209 million Dextre represents the most complex task of Endeavour's mission.

Capable of manipulating objects as big as a phone booth and as small as a phone book, Dextre is an attachment for the station's Canadian-built robot arm that, in effect, will give it a pair of hands capable of positioning components to within 2 millimeters and gripping them with as little as 1.5 pounds of force.

"If you could picture what a praying mantis would look like, that's what I liken Dextre to," Linnehan said in a NASA interview. "I grew up with cartoons and sci-fi and there used to be this show on when I was a kid called 'Gigantor, the Space Age Robot' and so, you know, my pet name for Dextre is 'Gigantor.' It's this giant robot with arms and out-riggers and all this equipment, with wrists and hands that actually move and can articulate itself all over the station."

Once assembled and attached to the station's robot arm, Dextre, equipped with force-sensing grippers for hands, TV eyes, a tool pouch and sophisticated control software, can be operated by astronauts or flight controllers on the the ground to perform equipment swap outs that otherwise would require a spacewalk.

"This is something we haven't attempted before so it kind of goes toward exploration and new technology development," said Dana Weigel, lead space station flight director at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. "But the other piece of it is it will save EVA time. If you look at it, EVAs are risky. This will buy down some risk. If this buys back one or two EVAs, that's certainly a good trade."

Joked Foreman, who will help Linnehan build the robot: "As spacewalkers, we don't want to put ourselves out of a job! But I think Dextre will be a boon to the space station when it gets built and put into work."

Installation of the Japanese module, assembly of Dextre and the transfer of spare parts to the station will take up the first three spacewalks. In a milestone test scheduled for the crew's fourth excursion, Foreman and Behnken plan to test a caulk gun-like device, squirting a thick, heat-resistant pink goo known as STA-54 into deliberately damaged heat shield tiles. The goal is to demonstrate a repair technique that could help a crippled shuttle make it through the heat of re-entry.

The demonstration is one of the final in-flight tests of procedures developed in the wake of the 2003 Columbia disaster to give astronauts a fighting chance in case of major heat shield damage that might otherwise prevent a safe descent to Earth.

"I consider it to be kind of the last thing we're going to do on the return to flight tile and (wing leading edge) repair tasks that we took on," said shuttle program manager John Shannon. "We have high confidence in it, but this will just be the final activity that we'll do to verify that's indeed a good repair capability."

While not a requirement, a successful test would give NASA added confidence about launching the shuttle Atlantis in late August on a final Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, a flight that cannot take advantage of safe haven aboard the space station if major heat shield damage occurs.

Along with transferring fresh water and supplies to the space station, the Endeavour astronauts also will temporarily store the shuttle's 50-foot-long heat-shield inspection boom on the forward face of the station's solar power truss for use by the crew of the next assembly mission. That flight will deliver the huge Japanese experiment module, or JEM, to the station and there is not enough room for the lab and the boom in Discovery's cargo bay.

"If you had to go to a drawing board and describe an exciting mission from scratch, I think you would come up with STS-123," Gorie said of Endeavour's flight. "We've got everything on this mission that you can imagine, going to the space station, taking Garrett up there and dropping him off for another crew member, 16 days on orbit, five spacewalks, international hardware, a night launch, a night landing. It's all there."

If all goes well, Endeavour will undock from the space station around 8 p.m. on March 24 and land back at the Kennedy Space Center around 8:33 p.m. on March 26.


-
Articolo:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080311launch/index2.html

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 01:06
mi sa che stanno iniziando ad avvicinarsi

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 01:17
Almeno penso...altrimenti ditemi voi cosa succede eheh

1.
http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/3955/shuttle1ij9.gif

2.
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/6395/shuttle2xn7.gif

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 09:58
Eccovi un'immagine curiosa che ho appena visto eheh...che cambio di colori repentini :asd:

http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/6897/shuttle3lh9.gif


Cmq lo Shuttle e la ISS stanno per avvicinarsi ed iniziare le manovre d'attacco...almeno da quanto ho capito vedendo anche il monitor.

Octane
12-03-2008, 10:09
[...]le manovre d'attacco...
LOL fa molto StarWars :D

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 10:11
LOL fa molto StarWars :D

haha...vero...mi sono dimenticato di una "R" ahha...

Attracco auehauheuahe...

cmq ho letto il programma e stanotte alle 3 (Ora italiana) avviene l'attracco dello Shuttle con la ISS...e non sarà trasmessa in Live:( :( :(

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 10:28
Ragazzi..mi ci avete fatto ammalare con sta cosa!!!

Io amo guardare lo spazio dalla terra, è emozionante...ma guardare la terra dallo spazio è qualcosa di indescrivibile!!!

http://img72.imageshack.us/img72/2333/iss1iw1.gif


Ora vi dvrete cominciare ad abituarvi a queste mie gif...me le voglio fare come ricordo e ve le posto anche a voi, nella speranza di fare cosa gradita eheh:Prrr:

Codename47
12-03-2008, 14:45
Ragazzi..mi ci avete fatto ammalare con sta cosa!!!

Io amo guardare lo spazio dalla terra, è emozionante...ma guardare la terra dallo spazio è qualcosa di indescrivibile!!!


Ora vi dvrete cominciare ad abituarvi a queste mie gif...me le voglio fare come ricordo e ve le posto anche a voi, nella speranza di fare cosa gradita eheh:Prrr:

Condordo pienamente, è una delle cose più emozionanti, durante la missione STS-122 son rimasto ore e ore appiccicato al monitor :)

GioFX
12-03-2008, 19:57
Almeno penso...altrimenti ditemi voi cosa succede eheh

1.
http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/3955/shuttle1ij9.gif

2.
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/6395/shuttle2xn7.gif


Ma no, è il braccio meccanico dello Shuttle (SRMS - Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, o Canadarm) che si aggancia al "grapple fixtures" dell'OBSS (Orbiter Boom Sensor System), utilizzato per la scansione del rivestimento termico dell'orbiter, durante il FD2 (secondo giorno di missione), così come nell'ultimo prima del rientro.

Il docking è previsto stanotte alle ore 11:25 PM EST (04:25 ora italiana).

PS: ne approfitto per ricordarvi che per questa missione è previsto che l'OBSS venga lasciato sulla stazione e sia poi ripreso dal Discovery nell'STS-124 del prossimo maggio (vedi prima pagina).

Octane
12-03-2008, 21:00
PS: ne approfitto per ricordarvi che per questa missione è previsto che l'OBSS venga lasciato sulla stazione e sia poi ripreso dal Discovery nell'STS-124 del prossimo maggio (vedi prima pagina).

al di la' del problema "logistico" degli shuttle, l'OBSS puo' tornare utile anche all'ISS? (sempre se compatibile con il canadarm2)

GioFX
12-03-2008, 21:19
al di la' del problema "logistico" degli shuttle, l'OBSS puo' tornare utile anche all'ISS? (sempre se compatibile con il canadarm2)

Non credo siano compatibili, cmq per qualcosa forse (tipo scansione ad infrarossi) potrebbe servire, anche se non saprei per cosa eventualmente.

:)

albertoz85
12-03-2008, 21:38
Non credo siano compatibili, cmq per qualcosa forse (tipo scansione ad infrarossi) potrebbe servire, anche se non saprei per cosa eventualmente.

:)

No, l'utilità sulla ISS potrebbe essere limitata esclusivamente come "pezzo meccanico", il Canadarm2 della ISS non è compatibile completamente con l'OBSS e non può quindi alimentarlo, può solo utilizzarlo come propria estensione, puramente meccanica, agganciandolo a metà e non ad una delle due estremità, dimezzandone quindi la lunghezza.
Come è successo durante STS-120 dovesse essere sganciato per qualunque motivo dalla ISS la vita degli strumenti di analisi è di poche ore senza alimentazione, ricordo che durante quella missione per eseguire la riparazione al solar array danneggiato fu impiegato in questo modo, ma furono danneggiati irrimediabilmente alcuni strumenti utilizzati per le ispezioni al TPS per mancanza prolungata (e prevista) di alimentazione.

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 21:40
Ma no, è il braccio meccanico dello Shuttle (SRMS - Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, o Canadarm) che si aggancia al "grapple fixtures" dell'OBSS (Orbiter Boom Sensor System), utilizzato per la scansione del rivestimento termico dell'orbiter, durante il FD2 (secondo giorno di missione), così come nell'ultimo prima del rientro.

Il docking è previsto stanotte alle ore 11:25 PM EST (04:25 ora italiana).

PS: ne approfitto per ricordarvi che per questa missione è previsto che l'OBSS venga lasciato sulla stazione e sia poi ripreso dal Discovery nell'STS-124 del prossimo maggio (vedi prima pagina).

ah...ora ho capito eheh...

fra poco posto un video che ho appena fatto dalla ISS eheh...aspettatevi il link da youtube :Prrr:

Dj Ruck
12-03-2008, 22:18
ecco a voi ragazzi...è un pò corto, ma bello, almeno per me eheh

http://it.youtube.com/watch?v=bElXRASkPos

commentate commentate:D :D

GioFX
13-03-2008, 00:12
Come è successo durante STS-120 dovesse essere sganciato per qualunque motivo dalla ISS la vita degli strumenti di analisi è di poche ore senza alimentazione, ricordo che durante quella missione per eseguire la riparazione al solar array danneggiato fu impiegato in questo modo, ma furono danneggiati irrimediabilmente alcuni strumenti utilizzati per le ispezioni al TPS per mancanza prolungata (e prevista) di alimentazione.

Non sapevo si fossero danneggiati degli strumenti. E' stato sostituto per intero o solo gli strumenti non funzionanti?

GioFX
13-03-2008, 00:45
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Shuttle Endeavour on course for station docking tonight

EDT........DD...HH...MM...EVENT

03/12/08
03:58 PM...01...13...30...STS crew wakeup
04:28 PM...01...14...00...ISS crew wakeup
05:00 PM...01...14...32...Post-MMT briefing on NASA TV
05:08 PM...01...14...40...Group B computer powerup
05:18 PM...01...14...50...ISS daily planning conference
05:28 PM...01...15...00...Rendezvous timeline begins
06:11 PM...01...15...43...NH rendezvous rocket firing
07:10 PM...01...16...42...NC-4 rendezvous rocket firing
07:58 PM...01...17...30...Spacesuits removed from airlock
08:42 PM...01...18...14...TI burn
09:18 PM...01...18...50...Service module lights on
09:18 PM...01...18...50...Sunset
09:23 PM...01...18...55...ISS crew meal
09:28 PM...01...19...00...Hand-held laser ops
09:41 PM...01...19...13...Range: 10,000 feet
09:49 PM...01...19...21...Range: 5,000 feet
09:53 PM...01...19...25...Approach timeline begins
09:54 PM...01...19...26...Sunrise
09:55 PM...01...19...27...Range: 3,000 feet
09:59 PM...01...19...31...MC-4 rendezvous burn
10:03 PM...01...19...35...Range: 1,500 feet
10:05 PM...01...19...37...U.S. solar arrays feathered
10:08 PM...01...19...40...Range: 1,000 feet
10:11 PM...01...19...43...KU antenna to low power
10:12 PM...01...19...44...+R bar arrival directly below ISS
10:17 PM...01...19...49...Range: 600 feet
10:22 PM...01...19...54...Noon
10:24 PM...01...19...56...RPM start window open
10:24 PM...01...19...56...Start pitch maneuver
10:30 PM...01...20...02...RPM full photo window close
10:32 PM...01...20...04...End pitch maneuver
10:34 PM...01...20...06...Initiate pitch up maneuver (575 ft)
10:38 PM...01...20...10...RPM start window close
10:42 PM...01...20...14...Russian arrays feathered
10:46 PM...01...20...18...+V bar arrival 310 feet directly in front of ISS
10:47 PM...01...20...19...Range: 300 feet
10:49 PM...01...20...21...Sunset
10:51 PM...01...20...23...Range: 250 feet
10:55 PM...01...20...27...Range: 200 feet
10:58 PM...01...20...30...Range: 170 feet
10:59 PM...01...20...31...Range: 150 feet
11:03 PM...01...20...35...Range: 100 feet
11:06 PM...01...20...38...Range: 75 feet
11:11 PM...01...20...43...Range: 50 feet
11:14 PM...01...20...46...Range: 30 feet; start stationkeeping
11:19 PM...01...20...51...End stationkeeping; push to dock
11:23 PM...01...20...55...Range: 10 feet
11:25 PM...01...20...57...Sunrise
11:25 PM...01...20...57...DOCKING
11:48 PM...01...21...20...Leak checks

03/13/08
12:08 AM...01...21...40...Docking video playback
12:18 AM...01...21...50...Orbiter docking system prepped for ingress
12:18 AM...01...21...50...Group B computer powerdown
12:33 AM...01...22...05...Post docking laptop reconfig
12:38 AM...01...22...10...Hatch open
01:08 AM...01...22...40...Welcome aboard!
01:13 AM...01...22...45...Safety briefing
01:38 AM...01...23...10...Post-docking EVA transfer
01:38 AM...01...23...10...Soyuz seatliner transfer to ISS
01:38 AM...01...23...10...SRMS grapples SLP
02:00 AM...01...23...32...Mission status briefing on NASA TV
02:28 AM...02...00...00...SLP unberth and install
02:28 AM...02...00...00...Soyuz seatliner installation
02:53 AM...02...00...25...REBA checkout
03:08 AM...02...00...40...Airlock preps
03:18 AM...02...00...50...Transfer ops (JLP and VOK)
03:33 AM...02...01...05...SLP ungrapple
04:28 AM...02...02...00...EVA-1: Procedures review
06:43 AM...02...04...15...EVA-1: Mask pre-breathe
07:38 AM...02...05...10...EVA-1: Airlock 10.2 psi depress
07:58 AM...02...05...30...ISS crew sleep begins
08:28 AM...02...06...00...STS crew sleep begins
09:00 AM...02...06...32...Daily video highlights reel on NASA TV
01:00 PM...02...10...32...Flight director update on NASA TV
04:28 PM...02...14...00...Crew wakeup


http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080312fd3/index.html

Dj Ruck
13-03-2008, 09:39
peccato, avrei voluto assistere all'attracco...ma non era in diretta :(:(

Dj Ruck
13-03-2008, 09:56
http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/5108/iss3rk8.gif

Tommy81
13-03-2008, 11:00
ecco a voi ragazzi...è un pò corto, ma bello, almeno per me eheh

http://it.youtube.com/watch?v=bElXRASkPos

commentate commentate:D :D

Che panoramica stupenda!!! :eek:

albertoz85
13-03-2008, 15:54
Non sapevo si fossero danneggiati degli strumenti. E' stato sostituto per intero o solo gli strumenti non funzionanti?

Beh di set strumenti dell'OBSS ne esistono più di uno, credo che quando tornerà il turno di quello utilizzato su STS-120 almeno una revisione completa a quello che era rimasto funzionante ci sarà... immagino verrà sostituito tutto il set... mi pare che l'OBSS utilizzato su STS-120 si quello attualmente in orbita ma non ne sono sicurissimo.
Era comunque stato danneggiato completamente l'LCS (Laser Camera System) del set2 di strumenti, che comunque non sarebbe stato più utilizzato nella "Late Inspection", mentre gli altri 3 strumenti sono rimasti operativi anche dopo la procedure adottata.

GioFX
13-03-2008, 20:26
peccato, avrei voluto assistere all'attracco...ma non era in diretta :(:(

non è che semplicemente eri a letto (come tutti :D)?

La diretta di tutte le missioni è continua su NASA TV, a parte le interruzioni per i briefing di ogni giorno e per le repliche delle attività di ogni giorno missione la notte.

Cmq, consiglio sempre di verificare il palinsesto su questa pagina:

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/mission_schedule.html

GioFX
13-03-2008, 20:30
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Endeavour arrives at station for international delivery

BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: March 13, 2008

The shuttle Endeavour glided to a gentle docking with the international space station late Wednesday as the two spacecraft sailed 212 miles above Malaysia at five miles per second. With commander Dominic Gorie at the controls, the shuttle's docking system engaged its counterpart on the front of the lab complex at 11:49 p.m. to wrap up a two-day orbital chase that began with Endeavour's sky-lighting blastoff early Tuesday.

---
Articolo:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080312fd3/index3.html

Dj Ruck
13-03-2008, 22:49
non è che semplicemente eri a letto (come tutti :D)?

La diretta di tutte le missioni è continua su NASA TV, a parte le interruzioni per i briefing di ogni giorno e per le repliche delle attività di ogni giorno missione la notte.

Cmq, consiglio sempre di verificare il palinsesto su questa pagina:

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/mission_schedule.html

No no...ho letto il programma dal sito della TV della NASA, se non sbaglio, e c'era scritto che l'aggancio non lo avrebbero trasmetto...

GioFX
13-03-2008, 23:30
No no...ho letto il programma dal sito della TV della NASA, se non sbaglio, e c'era scritto che l'aggancio non lo avrebbero trasmetto...

Secondo il thread di NSF (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=12246&posts=332&start=1) (con tanto di fotogrammi presi da NASA TV) e Space Multimedia (http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3431&Itemid=1), è stato regolarmente trasmesso.

Dj Ruck
13-03-2008, 23:51
Secondo il thread di NSF (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=12246&posts=332&start=1) (con tanto di fotogrammi presi da NASA TV) e Space Multimedia (http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3431&Itemid=1), è stato regolarmente trasmesso.

mah...io avevo scaricato un pdf con la programmazione e c'era scritto che non lo trasmettevano LIVE...uff

Dj Ruck
14-03-2008, 09:00
I ragazzi sono fuori :D :D :D

immagini molto a scatto ma audio chiaro:D :D

Frank1962
14-03-2008, 17:41
una domanda: ma perchè in queste ultime missioni lo shuttle ha sempre quella mezza stiva vuota? ...porta su moduli che occupano la metà o anche meno di quello che lo shuttle potrebbe contenere, non è un pò dispersiva una simile logistica per continuare la costruzione della stazione spaziale?

albertoz85
14-03-2008, 18:30
una domanda: ma perchè in queste ultime missioni lo shuttle ha sempre quella mezza stiva vuota? ...porta su moduli che occupano la metà o anche meno di quello che lo shuttle potrebbe contenere, non è un pò dispersiva una simile logistica per continuare la costruzione della stazione spaziale?

Beh la navetta (o un qualsiasi altro velivolo) ha come parametro dimensionante per il payload il peso massimo... non il volume massimo ;)

Frank1962
14-03-2008, 20:23
Beh la navetta (o un qualsiasi altro velivolo) ha come parametro dimensionante per il payload il peso massimo... non il volume massimo ;)

Space Shuttle --> Payload to LEO 24,400 kg

Experiment Logistics Module --> 4,200 kg

Mette che il dextre pesi altrettanto (improbabile) comunque non utilizza neanche la metà del peso trasportabile in LEO....

dupa
14-03-2008, 20:58
Space Shuttle --> Payload to LEO 24,400 kg

Experiment Logistics Module --> 4,200 kg

Mette che il dextre pesi altrettanto (improbabile) comunque non utilizza neanche la metà del peso trasportabile in LEO....

probabilmente usare vettori + potenti in partenza aumenta la pericolosità del lancio.
Oppure magari i giorni nello spazio non sono sufficienti per montare più di un modulo.

GioFX
14-03-2008, 20:59
una domanda: ma perchè in queste ultime missioni lo shuttle ha sempre quella mezza stiva vuota? ...porta su moduli che occupano la metà o anche meno di quello che lo shuttle potrebbe contenere, non è un pò dispersiva una simile logistica per continuare la costruzione della stazione spaziale?

Semplicemente perchè c'è una sequenza ben precisa di costruzione della ISS e lo Shuttle è indispensabile per le operazioni di assemblaggio in orbita. Non si può semplicemente portar su "tutto quello che ci sta". Ogni fase di installazione di un modulo, di un segmento o altro richiede precise operazioni ed EVA per la corretta installazione e configurazione. Queste sono quasi tutte operazioni che richiedono la presenza dell'orbiter (del braccio meccanico SRMS, nonchè del suo equipaggio - gli specialisti di missione - per le EVA e le operazioni robotiche).

La prossima missione, STS-124, porterà sulla ISS l'altro grande modulo (laboratorio) giapponese. In quell'occasione vedrai la stiva decisamente più "piena".

Cmq Atlantis durante l'ultima missione (STS-122), tra il il Columbus e gli altri "payloads" ha portato in orbita più di 17 tonnellate.

gpc
14-03-2008, 21:00
Space Shuttle --> Payload to LEO 24,400 kg

Experiment Logistics Module --> 4,200 kg

Mette che il dextre pesi altrettanto (improbabile) comunque non utilizza neanche la metà del peso trasportabile in LEO....

Ma bisognerà anche contare il tempo che devono impiegare per montare il tutto, non è che possono stare in orbita due mesi perchè nella stiva ci entrano anche i mobili dell'Ikea per il salotto della ISS :D

GioFX
14-03-2008, 21:04
Esatto, e il tempo in una missione Shuttle è essenzialmente limitato dai "consumabili", cioè le celle a combustibile che generano elettricita ed acqua potabilizzata come sottoprodotto.

GioFX
14-03-2008, 21:10
Da NasaSpaceFlight.com:

EVA-1 and JLP installation completed - Endeavour's TPS cleared

By Chris Bergin, 3/13/2008 2:01:29 PM

STS-123's EVA-1 - the opening spacewalk of the mission - has been completed, while the Shuttle Robotic Manipulator System (SRMS) arm has relocated the newly arrived JLP to Node 2, as it officially becomes part of the Station.

Engineers on the ground - who evaluated the many hundreds of Rbar Pitch Maneuver (RPM) images - have also cleared the vehicle from requiring a Focused Inspection (FI).

---
Articolo:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=5379

albertoz85
14-03-2008, 21:33
Space Shuttle --> Payload to LEO 24,400 kg

Experiment Logistics Module --> 4,200 kg

Mette che il dextre pesi altrettanto (improbabile) comunque non utilizza neanche la metà del peso trasportabile in LEO....

Il payload trasportato in questa missione è circa 15ton.
E non c'è solo il JLP vuoto (il valore che hai scritto è quello del modulo vuoto) o il Dextre, vanno calcolati anche gli 8 rack di JLP pieni, i payload interni nel middeck, l'OBSS, il set di strumenti, la piattaforma su cui è montato il Dextre, la piattaforma per gli ORU, gli esperimenti esterni, l'airlock e le risorse come ossigeno e azoto per la ISS.

In più il valore che hai segnato per la LEO non è lo stesso per la ISS che ha un'orbita leggermente più alta e inclinata di quella che viene presa come riferimento per il payload in LEO, lo shuttle per missioni verso la ISS ha un payload massimo di circa 17ton e non sempre raggiungibile (varia anche in base al propellente imbarcato nell'ET).

Comunque in tutte le missioni da qui al termine del programma lo shuttle sta viaggiando a pieno carico per portare più materiale possibile sulla ISS, solitamente lo spazio che avanza è occupato o da esperimenti o da ORU (ricambi per vari elementi della ISS) e anche questa missione non fa eccezione essendo stati validati per il lancio solo a Dicembre i payload secondari: 3 ORU e 2 esperimenti "minori".

Octane
14-03-2008, 21:44
Ma bisognerà anche contare il tempo che devono impiegare per montare il tutto, non è che possono stare in orbita due mesi perchè nella stiva ci entrano anche i mobili dell'Ikea per il salotto della ISS :D
:rotfl: :rotfl:

Frank1962
15-03-2008, 15:22
grazie 1000 per delle risposte così complete......adesso ho più chiaro come funzionano queste missioni dello shuttle!

un'ultima perplessità: ho letto che l'ATV è capace di effettura il rendevouz completamente in automatico ...se le missioni di "attacco" dei componenenti sono così complesse e costose sia per le EVA che per il tempo che necessitano, perchè non hanno preferito nell'invesitire nel campo del docking automatico di componenti?

Ukronia
15-03-2008, 18:30
grazie 1000 per delle risposte così complete......adesso ho più chiaro come funzionano queste missioni dello shuttle!

un'ultima perplessità: ho letto che l'ATV è capace di effettura il rendevouz completamente in automatico ...se le missioni di "attacco" dei componenenti sono così complesse e costose sia per le EVA che per il tempo che necessitano, perchè non hanno preferito nell'invesitire nel campo del docking automatico di componenti?

Perchè l'ATV, ha un sistema di propulsione autonomo, mentre gli altri componenti no, i quali poi, una volta nella posizione definitiva, devono essere collegati con i cablaggi dei vari sistemi al resto della ISS, mediante EVA.

Ciao

Xile
16-03-2008, 08:51
Ma quanto casino c'é nella ISS, pieno di cavi a penzoloni, non è rischioso?

GioFX
16-03-2008, 13:10
Da NasaSpaceFlight.com:

STS-123 completes EVA-2 - Dextre gains its arms

By Chris Bergin, 3/15/2008 6:27:03 PM

Flight Day 6 has seen the completion of the second of five EVAs during STS-123, as the newly powered up Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) robot "Dextre" takes shape, ahead of its role on the International Space Station (ISS).

Flight Day 6 has seen the completion of the second of five EVAs during STS-123, as the newly powered up Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) robot "Dextre" takes shape, ahead of its role on the International Space Station (ISS).

---
Articolo:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=5382

Octane
17-03-2008, 09:40
ma i canadesi fanno solo bracci meccanici? :D


(era solo una battuta, non crocifiggetemi ;) )

Cico the SSJ
17-03-2008, 18:36
ma sto dextre a cosa serve in poche parole?

GioFX
17-03-2008, 21:02
ma sto dextre a cosa serve in poche parole?

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Purpose_Dexterous_Manipulator

dupa
17-03-2008, 21:39
ma sto dextre a cosa serve in poche parole?

per ricordare agli astronauti la regola della mano destra.

Xile
18-03-2008, 14:55
After three space walks, Dextre—the robot that will now service the International Space Station—has been completed today, and is now ready for activation.

http://gizmodo.com/assets/resources/2008/03/dextre-completed.jpg

http://gizmodo.com/369048/first-pictures-of-completed-dextre-giant-space-robot

GioFX
25-03-2008, 01:06
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Endeavour to depart the space station later today

BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: March 24, 2008

The Endeavour astronauts are gearing up to undock from the international space station this evening to close out a marathon five-spacewalk assembly mission. A brief farewell ceremony is planned for 5:13 p.m., followed by hatch closure around 5:30 p.m. With shuttle pilot Gregory Johnson at the controls, Endeavour is scheduled to disconnect from the space station's forward docking port, pressurized mating adapter No. 2, at 7:56 p.m. After looping around the lab complex for a photo survey, Johnson will fire the shuttle's maneuvering jets to leave the area around 9:40 p.m.

"There are a number of key steps both vehicles have to go through to make sure the undocking goes smoothly," said space station Flight Director Bob Dempsey. "First of all, we have to maneuver the combined space station-orbiter vehicle to the undocking attitude, as it's called. Normally, when the orbiter's docked there, the PMA-2, or the pressurized mating adapter 2 (docking port) is flying in the direction the vehicle is going. When the orbiter is docked, we actually flip the vehicle 180 degrees around ... so the delicate thermal protection system on the orbiter, the tiles, are not into the wind, as we say, and vulnerable to debris strikes. So we fly with the shuttle sort of in the back with the belly sort of facing downwind.

"But we can't undock in that position. So we will flip the station around 180 degrees to get them in the right orientation. Then another thing we will do to get ready for the undock is we will park the KU antenna on the space station. We do that so we don't radiate the orbiter. ... And then we will begin a series of minor power downs. The reason we're doing that is, the next thing we have to do is configure the solar arrays on the space station, both the giant U.S. arrays and the Russian arrays, so that as the orbiter's undocking and it's firing its thrusters, that impinges material that can dirty up and push, do some structural damage, to the solar arrays. So we park those so they're kind of edge on to the thrusters so when the orbiter's backing away, we minimize the amount of impact to the solar arrays.

"So once we do all those things, we're in the undocking configuration," Dempsey said. "The shuttle will give the commands and back off from the space station. It'll move away slowly, we don't want to impart a big moment to the space station and push it very hard, cause it to tumble or anything like that. So it'll back off slowly and once the crew gets far enough away, they'll start some minor thruster firings, do it as gently as possible ... then they'll actually do a fly around."

Johnson will guide Endeavour through a full 360-degree loop, flying directly above, behind and below the station for a detailed photo survey.

"That's going to be a great thing for a pilot," Johnson told CBS News before launch. "Undocking is about the opposite of docking, you're leaving the space station at a pretty controlled rate. And then at the end of the undocking timeline, when we get about 300 to 400 feet away, then we start what's called a fly-around and that's where you take the orbiter and go 360 degrees all the way around the station, about 45 minutes of flying. You get to see angles of space station that aren't normally observed and just a great, exciting period for the whole crew."

When the shuttle is a safe distance away, station commander Peggy Whitson, flight engineer Yuri Malenchenko and newly arrived flight engineer Garrett Reisman will begin work to put the station back into its normal operating mode, putting the solar arrays back in sun-track and powering up systems that were shut down earlier. Because of ongoing problems with one of the station's solar array rotary joints, the S4 solar panels on the right side of the complex will remain locked in place.

Here is an updated timeline of today's activity (in EDT and mission elapsed time; includes revision L of the NASA television schedule):



EDT........DD...HH...MM...EVENT

03/24/08
11:43 AM...13...09...15...Crew wakeup
02:58 PM...13...12...30...Spacesuits transferred to shuttle
04:13 PM...13...13...45...Oxygen system teardown
05:13 PM...13...14...45...Farewell ceremony
05:28 PM...13...15...00...Hatch closure
05:33 PM...13...15...05...Group B computer powerup
05:58 PM...13...15...30...Leak checks
06:39 PM...13...16...11...ISS maneuvers to undocking attitude
06:42 PM...13...16...14...Sunrise
06:43 PM...13...16...15...Centerline camera setup
07:09 PM...13...16...41...ISS in undocking attitude
07:13 PM...13...16...45...Noon
07:13 PM...13...16...45...Undocking timeline begins
07:21 PM...13...16...53...US solar arrays in undocking configuration
07:23 PM...13...16...55...PMA-2 departure config
07:44 PM...13...17...16...Sunset

07:56 PM...13...17...28...UNDOCKING

07:58 PM...13...17...30...ISS holds attitude
08:01 PM...13...17...33...Range: 50 feet; reselect -X jets
08:03 PM...13...17...35...Range 75 feet; low Z
08:13 PM...13...17...45...Sunrise
08:25 PM...13...17...57...Range: 400 feet; start fly around
08:34 PM...13...18...06...Range: 600 feet
08:36 PM...13...18...08...Shuttle directly above ISS
08:40 PM...13...18...12...ISS in TEA attitude
08:44 PM...13...18...16...Noon
08:48 PM...13...18...20...Shuttle directly behind ISS
08:59 PM...13...18...31...Shuttle directly below ISS
09:11 PM...13...18...43...Separation burn No. 1
09:15 PM...13...18...47...Sunset
09:39 PM...13...19...11...Separation burn No. 2
09:43 PM...13...19...15...Post undocking computer reconfig
09:45 PM...13...19...17...Sunrise
10:28 PM...13...20...00...Group B computer powerdown
10:28 PM...13...20...00...PMA-2 leak checks
10:30 PM...13...20...02...Mission status briefing on NASA TV
10:58 PM...13...20...30...ISS crew sleep begins
11:03 PM...13...20...35...EVA unpack and stow
11:03 PM...13...20...35...Undocking videoi replay
11:28 PM...13...21...00...Shuttle arm (SRMS) powerdown

03/25/08
02:58 AM...14...00...30...Crew sleep begins
03:00 AM...14...00...32...Daily video highlights reel on NASA TV

The fly around, Dempsey said, is "a good chance for us to really view the space station all the way around."
"The orbiter crew will be taking all kinds of high resolution photos of the space station and we can use that to check the configuration, make sure everything looks healthy. We will get some baseline photos of the JLP, the Japanese pressurized module that we just installed during this mission and then over time, we'll be able to compare those to other photos ... and just monitor over time. So it gives us a good opportunity to check out the space station."

Departing station crews normally carry out a detailed heat shield inspection just after undocking to make sure the orbiter's nose cap and wing leading edge panels were in good shape for re-entry. Endeavour's crew did that inspection Friday and stowed the shuttle's inspection boom on the station during a spacewalk Saturday so it will be available to the next station assembly crew. Because of interference issues with the Japanese Kibo research module scheduled for launch in May, there was not enough room to carry an inspection boom on that mission.

If all goes well, Johnson, commander Dominic Gorie, flight engineer Michael Foreman, Richard Linnehan, Robert Behnken, Japanese astronaut Takao Doi and returning European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts will pack up Tuesday and prepare the ship for landing Wednesday evening at the Kennedy Space Center.

Landing is targeted for 7:05:08 p.m. Wednesday and forecasters are calling for good weather, with scattered clouds at 3,500 feet and winds out of the north at eight knots, gusting to 12. A second landing opportunity is available one orbit later, at 8:39:06 p.m.

"I know we're still three days out from landing but the weather is looking pretty reasonable," astronaut Terry Virts radioed the shuttle Sunday evening. "For now it looks good. We'll keep our fingers crossed."

STS-123 deorbit and landing opportunities



ORBIT....SITE..TIG........LANDING

03/26/08

248......KSC...06:01 PM...07:05 PM (Nominal end of mission)
249......KSC...07:36 PM...08:39 PM
250......EDW...09:04 PM...10:06 PM
251......EDW...10:39 PM...11:41 PM

03/27/08

264......KSC...06:24 PM...07:27 PM (EOM + 1)
265......KSC...08:00 PM...09:02 PM
266......EDW...09:30 PM...10:32 PM
267......EDW...11:06 PM...12:08 AM

03/28/08

279......KSC...05:12 PM...06:15 PM (EOM + 2)
280......KSC...06:48 PM...07:50 PM
281......EDW...08:18 PM...09:21 PM
.........NOR...08:19 PM...09:22 PM
282......EDW...09:53 PM...10:56 PM
.........NOR...09:55 PM...10:57 PM
283......EDW...11:30 PM...12:31 AM


-
Articolo:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080324fd15/index.html

Dj Ruck
25-03-2008, 01:08
cominciano a ritornare a casa :D

GioFX
25-03-2008, 02:00
Fly-around in corso (NASA TV).

E' sempre spettacolare la vista dell'ISS intera.

Octane
25-03-2008, 19:23
Per quando e' previsto quindi l'atterraggio?
domani, dopodomani o venerdi'?

GioFX
25-03-2008, 20:10
Per quando e' previsto quindi l'atterraggio?
domani, dopodomani o venerdi'?

Domani sera, tra mercoledì notte e giovedi mattina. Il primo tentativo è previsto per le 7:05 PM EST (DST), 00:05 di giovedì 27 ora italiana.

ORBIT....SITE..TIG........LANDING

03/26/08

248......KSC...06:01 PM...07:05 PM (Nominal end of mission)
249......KSC...07:36 PM...08:39 PM
250......EDW...09:04 PM...10:06 PM
251......EDW...10:39 PM...11:41 PM

03/27/08

264......KSC...06:24 PM...07:27 PM (EOM + 1)
265......KSC...08:00 PM...09:02 PM
266......EDW...09:30 PM...10:32 PM
267......EDW...11:06 PM...12:08 AM

03/28/08

279......KSC...05:12 PM...06:15 PM (EOM + 2)
280......KSC...06:48 PM...07:50 PM
281......EDW...08:18 PM...09:21 PM
.........NOR...08:19 PM...09:22 PM
282......EDW...09:53 PM...10:56 PM
.........NOR...09:55 PM...10:57 PM
283......EDW...11:30 PM...12:31 AM

Dj Ruck
25-03-2008, 20:12
Grazie per le info Gioooo;) ;)

cmq poco fa c'erano immagini bellissime dallo spazio

GioFX
26-03-2008, 21:10
2005 GMT (4:05 p.m. EDT)

Now three hours from touchdown at the Kennedy Space Center.

The weather outlook for today's first landing opportunity is looking favorable for Endeavour's return to Earth. The deorbit burn to brake from orbit would occur at 5:58 p.m. EDT, leading to touchdown on Runway 15 at 7:05 p.m. EDT.

Meteorologists are predicting conditions at landing time to include scattered clouds at 5,000 feet, seven miles of visibility and easterly winds from 090 degrees at 8 peaking to 12 knots. That equates to a crosswind of 11 knots for Runway 15.

GioFX
26-03-2008, 22:48
2130 GMT (5:30 p.m. EDT)

WAVE OFF. Cloudy conditions that rolled into the Kennedy Space Center area late this afternoon has forced Mission Control to delay landing of space shuttle Endeavour for one orbit. The ship will remain in space an additional 90-minute revolution of the planet in hopes the weather improves.

The day's second and final landing opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 6:33 p.m., leading to a nighttime touchdown on the spaceport's three-mile-long concrete landing strip at 8:39 p.m. EDT.

GioFX
26-03-2008, 22:50
Prossimo tentativo

De-orbit burn: 7:33 PM EDT - 00:33 ora italiana

Landing: 8:39 PM EDT - 01:39 ora italiana

albertoz85
26-03-2008, 22:57
De-orbit burn: 6:33 PM EDT - 23:33 ora italiana


00:33 ora italiana ;)

Dj Ruck
26-03-2008, 23:00
xlè??? che sta succedendo???

GioFX
26-03-2008, 23:07
00:33 ora italiana ;)

Mannaggia a Ray che scrive l'orario del deorbit burn nel fuso centrale e l'atterraggio nel EDT... :fagiano:

Questa la timeline corretta (orari GMT-4).

EDT...........EVENT

..............Rev. 249 descent to KSC runway 15

07:13:14 PM...Mission control 'go' for deorbit burn
07:19:14 PM...MS seat ingress
07:28:14 PM...Single APU start

07:33:14 PM...Deorbit ignition
(alt: 216 sm; vel: 17,251 mph; dV: 206 mph; dT: 2:48)
07:36:02 PM...Deorbit burn complete

08:07:23 PM...Entry interface
(alt: 75.6 sm; vel: 16,979 mph; range: 5,055 sm)
08:12:18 PM...1st roll command to right
08:21:14 PM...1st right-to-left roll reversal
08:26:00 PM...C-band radar acquisition
08:32:34 PM...Velocity less than mach 2.5
(alt: 83,900 feet; vel: 1,704 mph)
08:34:46 PM...Velocity less than mach 1
(alt: 50,700 feet; vel: 613 mph)
08:35:32 PM...Shuttle on the heading alignment cylinder
08:39:06 PM...Landing

GioFX
26-03-2008, 23:11
xlè??? che sta succedendo???

Un fronte stratificato si sta muovento da nord-est a sud-ovest sulla penisola della Florida. Il meteo viola i parametri di approccio ed atterraggio (NO GO), che viene quindi posticipato di 1 orbita (249).

Dj Ruck
26-03-2008, 23:13
Un fronte stratificato si sta muovento da nord-est a sud-ovest sulla penisola della Florida. Il meteo viola i parametri di approccio ed atterraggio (NO GO), che viene quindi posticipato di 1 orbita (249).

ho capito...ma sono entrati nell'atmosfera?

albertoz85
26-03-2008, 23:13
Questa la timeline corretta (orari GMT-6).


GMT-4 :D

GioFX
26-03-2008, 23:20
ho capito...ma sono entrati nell'atmosfera?

NO. La fase di rientro comincia ufficialmente (ed è irreversibile) con il cosiddetto de-orbit burn, cioè nel momento in cui l'orbiter viaggiando ancora in attitudine contro-V (cioè con i motori rivolti verso la direzione dello spostamento) aziona i motori del sistema OMS (Orbital Maneuvering System) per abbassare la velocità di circa 200 miglia all'ora e ridurre il perigeo (cioè perdere altitudine), cominciando il rientro nell'atmofera terrestre.

GioFX
26-03-2008, 23:24
GMT-4 :D

ammazza, son proprio rinco!

:stordita:

GioFX
26-03-2008, 23:30
2210 GMT (6:10 p.m. EDT)

The next deorbit burn opportunity is 7:33 p.m. EDT (correction from the earlier Central Time typo, :read: ) for Endeavour to begin the hour-long glide back to Earth. The high-speed, tire-smoking touchdown would occur at 8:39 p.m. EDT on Runway 15 at the Shuttle Landing Facility.

Dj Ruck
26-03-2008, 23:35
NO. La fase di rientro comincia ufficialmente (ed è irreversibile) con il cosiddetto de-orbit burn, cioè nel momento in cui l'orbiter viaggiando ancora in attitudine contro-V (cioè con i motori rivolti verso la direzione dello spostamento) aziona i motori del sistema OMS (Orbital Maneuvering System) per diminuire la velocità di circa 200 miglia nautiche al secondo e diminuire il perigeo (cioè perdere altitudine), cominciando il rientro nell'atmofera terrestre.

ehehe...cpaito!!!

GioFX
26-03-2008, 23:52
2240 GMT (6:40 p.m. EDT)

Should the weather remain "no go" for the next landing opportunity that starts with the 7:33 p.m. EDT deorbit burn for touchdown at 8:39 p.m., then Endeavour would have to stay in space for another day. The landing possibilities for Thursday evening at Kennedy Space Center and the alternate site of Edwards Air Force Base in California are:

ORBIT....SITE...DEORBIT....LANDING

264......KSC....06:24 PM...07:27 PM
265......KSC....08:00 PM...09:02 PM
266......EDW....09:30 PM...10:32 PM
267......EDW....11:06 PM...12:08 AM

Those times in EDT...and could change by a few minutes.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:22
Commander Dom Gorie: "We trained for night landings."

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:23
2321 GMT (7:21 p.m. EDT)

Mission Control just asked commander Dom Gorie if he is comfortable about flying through low clouds between 5,000 and 6,000 feet at night or else wait for tomorrow night's daylight opportunity. Gorie replied he would be comfortable with those cloud conditions tonight.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:24
2323 GMT (7:23 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is beginning the maneuver to the deorbit burn attitude. Weather debates continue in Mission Control.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:25
2324 GMT (7:24 p.m. EDT)

GO FOR THE DEORBIT BURN! The cloud cover and weather has improve sufficiently, now being declared observed and forecast "go" at Kennedy Space Center. So entry flight director Richard Jones in Mission Control just gave approval for Endeavour to perform the deorbit burn at 7:33:14 p.m. EDT that will commit the shuttle for the trip back to Earth.

Touchdown in Florida is set for 8:39 p.m. EDT.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:30
2328 GMT (7:28 p.m. EDT)

Pilot Greg Johnson is activating one of three Auxiliary Power Units in advance of the burn, now five minutes away. The other two APUs will be started later in the descent to provide pressure needed to power shuttle's hydraulic systems that move the wing flaps, rudder/speed brake, drop the landing gear and steer the nose wheel. NASA ensures that at least one APU is working before committing to the deorbit burn since the shuttle needs only a single unit to make a safe landing.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:36
2333 GMT (7:33 p.m. EDT)

DEORBIT BURN IGNITION. Flying upside down and backwards above the Indian Ocean, Endeavour has begun the deorbit burn. The firing of the twin Orbital Maneuvering System engines on the tail of the shuttle will last two-and-three-quarter minutes, slowing the craft by about 250 mph to slip from orbit. The retro-burn will send Endeavour to Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a touchdown at 8:39 p.m. EDT.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 00:38
2336 GMT (7:36 p.m. EDT)

DEORBIT BURN COMPLETE. Endeavour has successfully completed the deorbit burn for the trip back home. Landing is scheduled for 8:39 p.m. EDT at the Cape to complete this 16-day space station assembly mission.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 01:09
0007 GMT (8:07 p.m. EDT Wed.)

ENTRY INTERFACE. Endeavour's thermal protection system is feeling heat beginning to build as the orbiter enters the top fringes of the atmosphere -- a period known as entry interface.

The shuttle is flying at Mach 25 with its nose elevated 40 degrees, wings level, at an altitude of 400,000 feet over the southern Pacific Ocean.

Touchdown remains set for 8:39 p.m. EDT in Florida.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 01:14
Endeavour's landing ground tracks
Second Kennedy Space Center opportunity (Orbit 249)

http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080324tracks/track4.gif

http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080324tracks/track5.gif

http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080324tracks/track6.gif


(Fonte: http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080324tracks/index2.html)

GioFX
27-03-2008, 01:32
0036 GMT (8:36 p.m. EDT Wed.)

Endeavour is traveling 30,000 feet in altitude at 280 knots.

0036 GMT (8:36 p.m. EDT Wed.)

The shuttle is in the Heading Alignment Cylinder, an imaginary circle to align with Runway 15. Commander Dom Gorie is piloting Endeavour through a 255-degree left-overhead turn over the Atlantic to loop around for landing on the northwest to southeast runway.

0035 GMT (8:35 p.m. EDT Wed.)

Endeavour is 40,000 feet in altitude, traveling just under 600 mph.

0035 GMT (8:35 p.m. EDT Wed.)

The twin sonic booms have rumbled across the Kennedy Space Center area, announcing the shuttle's arrival.

0034 GMT (8:34 p.m. EDT Wed.)

Endeavour is 52,000 feet in altitude, traveling at 700 mph.

0034 GMT (8:34 p.m. EDT Wed.)

The crew has been given a "go" for normal deployment of the drag chute after main gear touchdown.

0033 GMT (8:33 p.m. EDT Wed.)

Endeavour is 70,000 feet in altitude, traveling at 1,000 mph.

0033 GMT (8:33 p.m. EDT Wed.)

Now descending through 78,000 feet.

0032 GMT (8:32 p.m. EDT Wed.)

Endeavour is 90,000 feet in altitude, 85 miles from the runway, traveling at 2,000 mph.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 01:36
3 minutes to landing.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 01:39
0039 GMT (8:39 p.m. EDT Wed.)

TOUCHDOWN! Main gear touchdown. Pilot Greg Johnson is unfurling the drag chute as commander Dom Gorie brings the nose gear to the surface of Runway 15.

GioFX
27-03-2008, 01:45
0040 GMT (8:40 p.m. EDT Wed.)

WHEEL STOP. Endeavour has returned to Earth from the 25th space shuttle construction flight to the space station. The 16-day marathon mission accomplished five spacewalks, more than any previous shuttle visit to the station, and continued construction of the outpost by delivering the Kibo logistics module, the first of three elements that will comprise Japan's portion of the station, and assembled Canada's two-armed robot named Dextre, a maintenance handyman to be used on the station's exterior.

Quincy_it
27-03-2008, 08:50
Stavolta ho potuto seguire ben poco la missione. :(

Ho controllato proprio ora le home page del Corriere della Sera e Repubblica, neanche una news a riguardo. :rolleyes:

Dj Ruck
27-03-2008, 09:04
non ho seguito il rientro...peccato...quando la prossima???

danny2005
27-03-2008, 11:28
Ho rivisto il filmato dell'atterraggio

Sbaglio o erano fiammelle quelle sopra il timone di coda?

Gioooo cos'erano??

Codename47
27-03-2008, 14:40
Mannaggia, sono riuscito appena a vedere il lancio, una sola EVA e nemmeno il rientro :muro: Peccato, prossimo lancio comunque (STS-124) per il 7 maggio, orario da definire ma SICURAMENTE :read: non sarà in notturna per noi :D

GioFX
27-03-2008, 21:34
Ho rivisto il filmato dell'atterraggio

Sbaglio o erano fiammelle quelle sopra il timone di coda?

Gioooo cos'erano??

Erano gli scarichi delle valvole di ventilazione delle tre APU (Auxiliary Power Unit).

GioFX
27-03-2008, 21:35
Da SpaceFlightNow.com:

Shuttle Endeavour returns from space

BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: March 26, 2008;
Updated after post-landing news conference

Running one orbit late because of troublesome low clouds, the shuttle Endeavour plunged back to Earth Wednesday, dropping out of the night for a picture-perfect landing at the Kennedy Space Center to close out a marathon 16-day space station assembly mission. Joining the shuttle astronauts for the trip back to Earth was European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, launched to the station in February and returning after 48 days in space.

"I can't imagine the mission could have gone any better," said NASA Administrator Mike Griffin. "They made it look easy."


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Articolo:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts123/080326fd17/index5.html